WINDOWS

windows

WINDOWS

The benefits of replacing your old windows with new ones are tremendous. New widows add to curb appeal, energy efficiency, and home security. Other benefits are that new windows can reduce sound transmission, and stabilize temperatures at more comfortable levels in the home. Since windows are a major source of heat loss in winter, and of AC-cooled air loss in summer, that means higher energy costs for you.  Consequently, when replacing your windows, consider the type, the frame material, and the energy efficiency.  In conclusion, there are six main types:  awning, hopper, sliding, casement, fixed, and single- or double-hung.  In addition, there are many types of materials used to manufacture window frames, including:  aluminum or metal, composite wood products, fiberglass, vinyl, and wood.

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AWNING

Awning windows are hinged at the top (or bottom) and open outward, like skylights.

CASEMENT

Casement windows are hinged at the sides, and open outward, like French doors.

FIXED

Fixed windows don’t open, they are also known as “picture windows” or “roof windows.”

HOPPER

Hopper windows are hinged at the bottom or mid-frame, and open inward.

SINGLE OR DOUBLE HUNG

Single or double-hung windows slide vertically in the frame.  With double frame, both sashes slide up and down, with single-frame, only the bottom sash slides upward.

SINGLE OR DOUBLE SLIDING

Single or double-sliding windows slide horizontally in the frame.

SECURITY

To add more security, there are several different options:  pick a window with a double lock, add additional locks to the frame, add window bars, or add unbreakable glass.

EFFICIENT SOLUTIONS

Energy efficient windows are sealed air tight; they have more than one pane of glass as a thermal insulator, and the space between the panes can be filled with argon or krypton gas.  Specialized films can be adhered to the panes that can prevent heat gain from direct sun, or prevent UV light from penetrating the windows.  A tip, adding a storm window, weather stripping, or caulking in cracks, can greatly increase energy efficiency.